Accessibility Statement

Local Website SEO is committed to providing ¬†website that is accessible to the widest possible audience, including people with visual, hearing, cognitive or motor impairments. Our constant aim is to conform to World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 1.0 Level AA. Whilst every effort is made to ensure our website conform, this is by it’s very nature, an ongoing process.

Accessibility preferences

You may change the way this website looks to suit your preferences and needs. The settings that do this differ from browser to browser, but most browsers offer some or all of the following:

  • * Increasing the font size. If you find the size of the text on Local Website SEO too small you can easily adjust it by using the font size setting in your browser. If you use Internet Explorer, go to the “View” menu, select “Text Size” and then select either “Larger” or “Largest”.
    * Adjusting text and colour changes. Some users who rely on screen magnifiers can find white backgrounds give off a glare. You can change both the background and the text on Local Website SEO by changing some settings in your browsers. If you use Internet Explorer, look in the “Tools” menu, select “Internet Options”, select “Colours” and make changes to text and background colours in the “Colours” panel. Local Website SEO recommends Mozilla Firefox as our browser of choice for viewing this website. You can download the latest version of ‘Firefox’ and read about the product here: Firefox

PDFs and accessibility

Some of the documents on Local Website SEO are forms or publications created in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). Adobe Reader enables you to read PDFs. The latest versions of Adobe Reader (9.0+) offer more in the way of accessibility than earlier versions. You can find the latest version of Adobe Reader on the Adobe website here: Adobe Reader

You can download a useful document about how to access PDFs with various assistive technologies from the Adobe website (PDF) . You can also find tools and information to increase the accessibility of PDF documents on the Adobe website .

You can use a tool that converts PDF documents to HTML pages on the Adobe website . To use this tool, paste the complete URL of the PDF into the box labelled “URL” on this page. An HTML version will be created when you submit the form. There is also an email facility that will email you an HTML or text file translated from a URL or attached file.

Zip Files And Download

What are Zip files?

Zip files (.zip or .zipx) are single files, sometimes called “archives”, that contain one or more compressed files. Zip files make it easy to keep related files together and make transporting, e-mailing, downloading and storing data and software faster and more efficient. The Zip format is the most popular compression format used in the Windows environment, and WinZip is the most popular compression utility. At Local Website SEO, we offer free icons and or logos in a zip file format for you to download and keep free of charge.

To open Zip files, you may need an ‘unzip’ utility like WinZip. You can download WinZip free here.

Accessibility Wizard

If you use Windows, there is a program called Accessibility Wizard that enables you to set preferences for using your PC and the Internet. To find the Accessibility Wizard, look in the “Start” menu, select “Programs”, select “Accessories”, select “Accessibility”, select the “Accessibility Wizard” and then follow the instructions.

Supported browsers

Local Website SEO develops its online content to support a reasonable range of web browsers and operating systems.

Target browsers: Firefox, latest version
Other supported browsers:
Internet Explorer, latest version
Opera, latest version

If you have any difficulty viewing our content, please ensure that you have updated to the latest browser version. You should regularly upgrade your browser for safety and security.

Unsupported browsers may enable you to access the content on Local Website SEO, but with no guarantee that the content will be rendered correctly.

Feedback at Local Website SEO

Your suggestions and feedback on how to improve

accessibility

and services is very much appreciated. If you are experiencing any difficulties accessing the information on our pages, or would like to send us some feedback in general, please use our Help desk.

Further Accessibility Information

For further information on various disabilities, there are links to pages on the BBC website. Accessibility agencies encourage linking to the BBC website as it is known to be extremely useful and comprehensive.

You can find step-by-step details of how to optimise the user experience at Local Website SEO for users with difficulties or impairments on the BBC website.

Difficulties that people who are blind or who have visual impairments may encounter

Visual impairments include low vision, colour blindness, and blindness. There are many options to modify the computer display and appearance so it is more legible, or to receive information through sound or touch.

Windows And Mac Users

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who are blind and/or have visual impairments on the BBC website .

Find information about filling in forms for people who are blind and/or have visual impairments on the BBC website .

If you have visual impairments, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

  • * screen magnifiers enlarge a portion of the screen as you move the focus, thus increasing legibility
    * screen readers verbalise or “speak” everything on the screen including labels, menus, text, ALT text, etc
    * refreshable Braille displays provide tactile output of information represented on the computer screen
    * Braille embossers work with Braille translation programs, which convert text scanned in or generated via standard word processing programs into Braille, and then print it on the embosser
    * talking word processors are software programs that use speech synthesisers to provide auditory feedback of a page
    * large-print word processors allow you to view everything in large text without added screen enlargement
    * colour contrast testers are software that can be used to gauge whether the colours used on a site have sufficient contrast and are therefore legible
    * voice-activated software, also called speech recognition software, allows you to enter data using your voice rather than a mouse or keyboard

Difficulties that people with mobility or dexterity difficulties may encounter

Individuals with mobility or dexterity difficulties may not have much control over their limbs or may experience pain, discomfort, or loss of feeling in their fingers, hands, wrists, or arms, making it difficult to use a standard keyboard or mouse.
Windows users

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who have mobility or dexterity difficulties on the BBC website .

Find information about filling in forms for people who have mobility or dexterity difficulties on the BBC website.

Mac And Windows Users

Find general information about optimising the user experience for people who have mobility or dexterity difficulties on the BBC website .

If you have mobility or dexterity difficulties, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

  • * Voice-activated software, also called speech recognition software, allows you to enter data using your voice rather than a mouse or keyboard.
    * On-screen keyboard programs provide an image of a standard or modified keyboard on the computer screen. You can select the keys with a mouse, touch screen, trackball, joystick, switch technology, or electronic pointing device.
    * Touch screens are devices placed on the computer monitor (or built into it) that allow direct selection or activation of the computer by touching the screen.
    * Keyboard filters include typing aids, such as word prediction utilities and add-on spelling checkers. These products reduce the required number of keystrokes. Keyboard filters enable users to quickly access the letters they need and to avoid inadvertently selecting keys they don’t want.
    * Alternative input devices include alternative keyboards, expanded, guarded keyboards, electronic pointing devices, sip-and-puff systems, wands and sticks, joysticks and track balls. They allow you to control your computer through means other than a standard keyboard or pointing device.

Difficulties that people who are deaf or who have hearing difficulties may encounter

Hearing difficulties can range from slight hearing loss to deafness. People who are deaf or who have hearing difficulties might be able to hear some sound, but might not be able to distinguish words.

Windows And Mac Users

Accessibility difficulties that people with learning difficulties may encounter

Learning difficulties can range from conditions such as dyslexia and attention deficit disorder to retardation. Many individuals with learning difficulties are perfectly capable of learning if information is presented to them in a form and at a pace that is appropriate to them individually.

Details of how to optimise the user experience specifically for people who have learning difficulties can be found on the BBC website.

Windows And Mac Users

Find details of how to optimise the user experience for people who have learning difficulties on the BBC website.

If you have learning difficulties, you may be interested in the following assistive technology:

  • * Word prediction programs allow you to select a desired word from a list of words predicted by the first one or two letters typed. You can then select the word from the list and insert it into the text by typing a number, clicking the mouse or scanning with switch technology.
    * Reading comprehension programs focus on establishing or improving reading skills through ready-made activities, stories, exercises or games. These programs can help practice letter/sound recognition and can increase the understanding of words.
    * Reading tools and learning disability programs include software designed to make text-based materials more accessible for people who have problems reading. Options can include reformatting, navigating, scanning or speaking text out loud.
    * Speech synthesisers (often referred to as text-to-speech (TTS) systems) receive information going to the screen and then “speak” it out loud. Individuals who have lost the ability to communicate orally can use a speech synthesiser to communicate by typing information and having the speech synthesiser speak it out loud.
    * Voice-activated software, also called speech recognition software, allows you to enter data using your voice rather than a mouse or keyboard.

Difficulties that senior citizens may encounter on the Internet

As we get older many of us will develop vision, hearing, dexterity or mobility conditions that may impact us when using a computer.

Details of how to optimise the user experience for people who have any difficulties and impairments associated with aging can be found on the BBC website.

Trouble seeing the screen

If you have trouble seeing the screen you could:

  • * increase text size
    * magnify areas on the screen using Windows Magnifier, if you are using Windows
    * invert colours on the screen using Windows Magnifier, if you are using Windows

Windows And Mac Users

Find details of how to optimise the user experience for people who have trouble seeing the screen on the BBC website.

Difficulty hearing computer sounds

If you have difficulty hearing computer sounds you could:

  • * turn up the volume
    * use headphones to help block out background noise
    * adjust computer system sounds that are easier for you to hear
    * use text or visual alternatives to sound for alerts, etc

Windows users And Mac Users

Find details of how to optimise the user experience for people who have difficulty hearing computer sounds on the BBC website.

Difficulty typing or controlling the mouse

If you experience difficulties when typing or controlling the mouse you could:

  • * use “Filter Keys” to ignore brief or repeated keystrokes
    * use “Sticky Keys” to press multiple keys at once
    * adjust the mouse cursor size, appearance and pointer options
    * change the way the mouse scrolls and how the buttons work, including the double-click speed
    * use “ClickLock” if you don’t want to hold the mouse button down while you drag items with the mouse

Windows And Mac Users

Find details of how to optimise the user experience for people who have difficulty typing or controlling the mouse on the

BBC website.

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